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Zahura's family is involved in crop irrigation. They are without work during the floods and lose their source of income. Her family receives some relief materials during the floods through public and private initiatives, but this is not enough.

She thinks the government's relief distribution is not the solution to the problem. She realises that communication in the area must be improved, shelters must be built and the electricity problems must be solved. They want deep tube wells and solar power to solve the problem of clean drinking water during the floods.

The big question is, how far can Zahura go in life? She wants to work in the IT sector after finishing her studies, but can she overcome the harmful effects of climate change?

Sraboni Rakhine dreams of a new life

Super Cyclone Sidr hit on 15 September 2007, devastating nature and humanity in its trail. The terrible impact that Sidr on life, nature and the environment are still the worst memories of the coastal people. Sraboni Rakhine of Rangabali upazila in Patuakhali district recalled the day. "Before we could realise anything, the paddy was all blown away. The storm uprooted all the coconut and mango trees. Our roof was blown away by the storm. The fish were washed away from the pond. We had to take shelter in the house of a neighbour and somehow survived."

During any natural disaster, the families of the Rakhine neighborhood do not get any shelter. The government primary schools used as shelters are far away from the Rakhine villages

Sraboni Rakhine was in Class 8 when Sidr struck. In 2012 Sraboni was admitted to Patuakhali Government College. She went on to study political science, but has had to stop in the middle of her education. Sraboni said it is almost impossible to go to Patuakhali district town every day from her house in Kanakuni Rakhine Para.

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During any natural disaster, the families of the Rakhine neighborhood do not get any shelter. The government primary schools used as shelters are far away from the Rakhine villages. The people living around the school can reach the shelter quickly, but due to the distance, the residents of the Rakhine village reach late. There is no space for them at these shelters by the time they reach.

Weaving is a traditional occupation of the Rakhine families. Rakhine youth now want to weave cloth commercially. But who will buy their products? There is no market, and so the looms in the Rakhine areas are not being used outside of family needs.

"We can weave cloth commercially from our looms," said Sraboni Rakhine. "In addition to financial support, we need to build a easily accessible marketing system for the fabric produced. We believe that if we can arrange for the sale of our textiles through public-private initiatives, we will be able to start a new life again."

Sanwar suffers the impact of climate change

Almost inaccessible, Ashtamir Char of Chilmari upazila of Kurigram is a remote village that can only be reached by boat. This is the home of Sanwar Hossain. He studied at the local Rajibpur Degree College. He is the witness of nine big floods. In his 24 years of life, his house has been destroyed four times.

I want to work to alleviate the misery of the people of this village. The organisation 'We for Humanity', formed by our friends, has 71 members. It is now working to prevent child marriage, provide relief to the poor at religious festivals and help distribute public and private relief material.
Sanwar Hossain of Chilmari, Kurigram

Sanwar said, "I have heard that the houses my father and forefathers were destroyed too. Now the water is rising at the moment. I'm tired of losing everything and starting a new life. Where does it end?"

According to Sanwar, river erosion has increased due to continuous rains. He said the incidence of rising water in the upper reaches has increased over the years. Sanwar said "My father used to say that in their time there was no danger other than flood water. But now water from upstream water is a matter of great concern."


Sanwar said now the water level rises during the floods and the rest of the time too. Houses are washed away into the river due to heavy rains. When the water recedes and the land rises, paddy is planted in the hope of cultivation. But the crops die due to climate change.

Sanwar's grandfather's two acres of land is now in the river. At present his whole family lives in his grandfather's house. "My father died three months ago," said Sanwar, now responsible for the whole family. Besides studying, he runs his family by doing seasonal work, Sanwar said.

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Sanwar said he did not see any government initiative to prevent river erosion. "If we get enough government support, we would not have to sleep with the tension of our house collapsing year after year. River erosion is rendering destitute. The government should take initiatives to reduce poverty. Besides, there is a lack of pure water in this area. Deep tube wells need to be installed."

About his future plans, Sanwar said he wanted to stay in the village after finishing his studies. "I want to work to alleviate the misery of the people of this village. The organisation 'We for Humanity', formed by our friends, has 71 members. It is now working to prevent child marriage, provide relief to the poor at religious festivals and help distribute public and private relief material."

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