The Incidents of extrajudicial killings declined significantly in the country over the last three months, according to rights group Ain O Salish Kendra (ASK).

A report compiled by ASK and presented at a virtual discussion on Thursday noted that only nine incidents of extrajudicial killings took place in three months -- three each in August, September and October.

ASK assistant co-coordinator Tamanna Hoq said extrajudicial killings fell considerably since the killing of retired major Sinha on 31 July.

As per their report, Tamanna said 50 incidents of extrajudicial killings took place in the country alone in July and 28 in June.

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She said 219 persons were killed by law enforcers either in custody or in so-called gunfights till 25 October.

Besides, Tamanna said 63 people died in different jails of the country for various reasons, including illness, during the same period.

She said 1,307 women were raped across the country till 25 October this year. "Of them, 326 were violated alone in October."

Of the total victims, 270 were subjected to gang-rape while 45 were killed after rape and 13 committed suicide.

Tamanna said 1,398 children were tortured in different ways while 474 were killed over the last 10 months.

Of the total victims, she said 824 children were subjected to rape while 25 boys were molested at different educational institutions.

She said 41 Bangladeshis were killed along the border until 25 October this year. Of them, 35 were gunned down by Indian Border Security Force (BSF) while six others were tortured to death.

The report was prepared based on news published in different national dailies, online news portals, and the rights body's own findings.

Speaking at the programme, chairperson of the National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) Nasima Begum said the extrajudicial killing cannot be supported in any way.

"It's an extreme violation of human rights. No person having conscience can support such killings," she said.

She said their commission is very vocal against the extrajudicial killings.

Nasima said their commission is very worried over the rise in rape of women and children and molestation of boys. "There's no alternative to ensuring prompt trial for these incidents," she said.

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