Advertisement
Advertisement

"At the US trials in Eugene (host city of next year's world championships) it was in excess of 40 degree Celsius. This is the challenge we are all going to confront now, and it will probably need a global discourse around the calendar and how we stage events.

"I'm no climatologist but the reality is that wherever we go the new norm will be dealing with really harsh climatic conditions."

The 1964 Tokyo Games were held in October, as were the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City. Seoul in 1988 and Sydney 2000 were both in September, but the norm for northern hemisphere cities has been for July or August.

Next year's soccer World Cup in Qatar has been shifted from its normal summer slot and will be held in November-December to avoid the worst of the heat.

Coe did mention that for the sprinters the conditions were ideal for warm ups and performance.

One of them, Italy's Lamont Marcell Jacobs was one of the stories of the Games after his shock 100m win and his role in Italy's 4x100m relay victory.

After coming into the year with a personal best of over 10 seconds Jacobs took gold last week in a European record of 9.80, leading to immediate speculation that his starling improvement was a result of chemical help.

Jacobs said on Saturday he had split from his former nutritionist once he heard that Giacomo Spazzini was allegedly being investigated for a connection with performance-enhancing substances.

"If you make breakthroughs people ask questions," Coe said. I'm sure they did about my career. I came back from the European championships in 1978 with a bronze medal and a year later I had three world records."

Coe said that any doping questions are now addressed by the independent Athletics Integrity Unit.

"I'm satisfied that we have the best unit of its kind in any sport," he said. "But we have to be permanently vigilant."

Read more from Climate Change
Advertisement