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Speaking at the dialogue, former caretaker government adviser Hossain Zillur Rahman said that as the Afghanistan situation is still emerging, it would not be correct to take any analytical decision right away. Three possibilities are being discussed. Firstly, it is being said that this was not a religious war, but a nationalist war.

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Secondly, how will the global powers use this situation in light of extremist and terrorist realities? And then, whether the new Taliban government will give priority to good governance and a liberal stance. That is why Bangladesh must carefully observe the situation and take a cautious decision about recognising the Taliban government, he said.

Bangladesh must have its own foreign policy regarding Afghanistan. The adversity between India and China should not influence Bangladesh. We must proceed with caution. We must take our own decisions
ANM Muniruzzaman, President of BIPSS

Various alliances will emerge on geopolitical considerations over the change in Afghanistan, he pointed out, adding that Bangladesh would have to ascertain what stand to take in order to ensure its own interests.

Former foreign secretary Shamsher Mobin Chowdhury said one state recognises another state, not a government. Bangladesh recognised Afghanistan as a state long ago. So rather than recognition of the Taliban government, the question to be considered now is about how relations will be with them, and to discern by preliminary discussions, how responsible they will be concerning women's education, development and other issues.

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It must be observed how far the Taliban have actually moved away from their original ideology and actions.
Md Touhid Hossain, Former foreign secretary

The characteristics of the new Taliban government is not likely to have much difference with the Taliban government of 20 years ago, feels Maj Gen (retd) ANM Muniruzzaman, president of Bangladesh Institute of Peace and Security Studies (BIPSS).

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He said, "Bangladesh must have its own foreign policy regarding Afghanistan. The adversity between India and China should not influence Bangladesh. We must proceed with caution. We must take our own decisions."

He also said that with the rise of the Taliban, certain extremist elements within Bangladesh were trying to reorganise themselves. A sharp watch must be kept in this regard, he added.

Former foreign secretary Md Touhid Hossain said as Afghanistan and Bangladesh do not share a border, the impact Taliban's rise may be felt a bit less here. Even so, caution is required regarding the extremist elements. It must be observed how far the Taliban have actually moved away from their original ideology and actions.

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Secretary general of Islami Oikya Jote Mufti Faizullah feels that the new Taliban have changed their mindset towards women's rights and human rights compared to the Taliban of 20 years ago.

He said, the rise of the Taliban has been a source of joy, satisfaction and inspiration to the Islamic parties. However, the parties have no intention of using this to create disorder or extremism in the country.

In his opening presentation, chief executive of the Study Group on Regional Affairs, Amir Khasru, said that new propensities in Afghanistan indicated that the war was not completely over. A humanitarian crisis had emerged there. Conflict between the new Taliban and the old Taliban was making it challenging to form a government. While the Taliban have professed they will not aid and abet militancy, no one could have confidence in this.

Discussions have also begun on what challenges Afghanistan's neighbouring countries will face in this situation.

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